Abstract Review

American Politics

Name: Alexandra Agostinelli
Section: American Politics
Professional Email: ajagosti@buffalo.edu
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: University At Buffalo
Scheduling Preference: Saturday Morning
Proposal Type: Paper
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Paper Title:  Political Habits of Bronies: A Comparative Study on Non-Governmental Participation among Bronies
Abstract:
This study aims to examine the impact of popular culture on political beliefs. Specifically, it explores whether involvement and comfort expressing that involvement in the My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic fan community influences the adult fans’ feelings of political efficacy and their level of level of involvement in civic and non-electoral political participation compared to the general population of American adults, regardless of political identification. This research hypothesizes that as individuals become more connected to a culturally homogenous and identifiable community, the more that community will mold their political opinions and actions. In addition, when the cohesiveness that binds a community together is a media product, the explicit and implicit messages contained in that product will influence the opinions and behaviors of the individuals in the community. Greater involvement and connection to the community leads to higher civic and non-electoral participation. To collect data, in- person interviews of attendees at the BronyCon convention in Baltimore during early August 2014 were conducted. Surveys were also administered through a number of social network sites visited by fans of the franchise. This dual data collection technique promises to bring richness to the findings that emerge from the study, as the qualitative responses from the personal interviews can be used to elucidate the various mechanisms whereby membership in a fan community influences aspect of political behavior and belief construction. Counties with more than three respondents were used to compare respondent’s ideology and the general population. One interesting finding is, as as a whole, the Brony community leans politically left, however in the locations of respondents that allowed for further analysis, the Bronies leaned politically right.



Comparative Politics

Name: Monday Dickson
Section: Comparative Politics
Professional Email: mondaydickson@aksu.edu.ng
Professional Status: Assistant Professor
Institution: Akwa Ibom State University, P.M.B 1167, Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria
Scheduling Preference: No Preference
Proposal Type: Paper
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Paper Title:  Global Economic Crisis and Recession in Nigeria: The Linkages and Consequences
Abstract:
In 2008, the global economy experienced the most severe crash since the 1930s. The economic downturn took a heavy toll on the economy of both rich and poor countries creating joblessness, wage stagnation and widespread economic insecurity. Soon after the world economy came out of the morass of the decline, recession engulfed the Nigeria State that had for the previous decades experienced sustained growth at unprecedented levels. This article examines the relationship between many of the key issues prevalent during the global economic crisis and recession in Nigeria. The study adopts the descriptive/qualitative research technique and relied essentially on relevant secondary data. Using the Marxian approach to economic crisis as the framework of analysis, the paper probes important questions including: What were the major causes of global economic crisis vis-a-vis recession in Nigeria? What is the relationship between the global economic crisis and recession Nigeria? The study argues that the sharp collapse in global economy left no country on the globe immune to recession owing to deep contradictions inherent in world capitalist system. Findings reveal that recession in Nigeria was a reaction from the global economic crisis which emerged from the basic working of capitalism. Consequently, Nigeria and other developing countries have been increasingly affected by the recession in advanced economies through the consequences of unbalanced trade and financial market channels. While the nation must adjust to the challenges of global capitalism, there is the need to refashion every aspect of the domestic economy towards diversification for self-sufficiency.


Name: Prince Aian Villanueva
Section: Comparative Politics
Professional Email: prince_villanueva@dlsu.edu.ph
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: Doctoral School of Political Science, Corvinus University of Budapest, Hungary
Scheduling Preference: No Preference
Proposal Type: Paper
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Paper Title:  Multiple pathways to corruption: A qualitative comparative analysis of corruption in Central Eastern Europe
Abstract:
Informed by the literature on democratization and civil society-corruption nexus, the paper is an attempt to describe the conditions through which the civil society (CS) affects control of corruption in Central Eastern Europe. It is argued that through “democratic anchoring” (Morlino, 2011), a process in which the civil society is linked to the new institutions through actions of the intermediate actors, the institutional design and external actors, the anticorruption effects of CS are facilitated. Specifically, the paper argues that the presence/absence of strong and cooperative civil society-political party linkages (parties as intermediate actors), institutionalization of civil society including participation in the anticorruption framework (institutional/constitutional design), and the external actors’ influence (such as the media) condition the CS’s impact on control of corruption in states in CEE. Qualitative comparative analysis (QCA) is used to probe into the above objective.



History and Politics


International Relations and American Foreign Policy

Name: Yaela Collins
Section: International Relations and American Foreign Policy
Professional Email: ycollins@bassiounigroup.com
Professional Status: Practitioner
Institution: The Bassiouni Group/ Friends of Adwan Nepal
Scheduling Preference: Saturday Afternoon
Proposal Type: Panel
Panel Title:  The Intersections of Human Rights and Security
Panel Description: The purpose of this panel is to discuss the relationships between development, human rights, and security. Perspectives from crime researchers, a human rights and country expert, development expert, and advocate will portray a well-rounded perspective on how awareness and education can help mitigate security issues that stem directly from a lack of development and human rights suppression.
Co-author info: Sabrina Diaz, independent researcher
Co-presenter info: Sabrina Diaz- paper co-author/presenter Dr. Bishnu Maya Pariyar- Dalit rights expert to present on the caste system and vulnerable communities in Nepal (specifically Dalit women and children) Dr. David Bassiouni- Humanitarian/development expert to present on the connections between development and security Joan Goldman- Awareness expert to present on the structure of FAN and organization strategies for issue mitigation
Paper Title:  Societal Status as a Security Vulnerability: Human Trafficking in Nepal
Abstract:
The Nepali caste system is heavily influenced by the Hindu caste system in terms of structure and interpretation of the value of status. Of the more than 40 caste and ethnic groups in Nepal, Dalits are considered the lowest and designated “untouchables.” Because of issues related to the population hierarchy, Nepal has suffered from political corruption, social discrimination, economic insecurity, and various modes of criminal activity, namely human trafficking for forced labor and sex work. While the social stratification system was made illegal in 1962, Nepali society still recognizes social classifications based on birthright, ethnicity, occupation, power and financial status. The perpetual informal caste system is a security vulnerability for low status groups as it inhibits individual growth, contributes to structural violence, and fosters willful blindness to the plight of the poor. A desk review and field work study undertaken over the course of seven months uncovered that government disinterest, poor data collection, and upper caste complacency has allowed Nepal to become a source, transit and destination country for human trafficking.


Name: Alexandra Orlova
Section: International Relations and American Foreign Policy
Professional Email: aorlova@ryerson.ca
Professional Status: Associate Professor
Institution: Ryerson University
Scheduling Preference: Friday Morning
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Paper Title:  “Foreign Agents,” Sovereignty and Political Pluralism: How Russian Foreign Agents Law is Shaping Civil Society
Abstract:
During the 1990s many Russian NGOs were successful in securing foreign funding and participating in transnational advocacy networks. However, as of early 2000s, the Russian authorities expressed concern over foreign and especially American-funded NGOs and their work and attempted to regain control over their activities, presenting them as national security threats. The 2012 Russian “foreign agents” law (claimed to be modeled on the US Foreign Agents Registration Act) and a 2018 pending case filed by Russian NGOs in front of the European Court of Human Rights challenging the provisions of the law, are reflective of contemporary Russian political rhetoric that views Western (and particularly US) governments and their agents, including NGOs, as attempting to undermine Russia’s ruling regime and posing a threat to national security. However, using the mechanism of legal challenges to challenge the provisions of the Russian “foreign agents” law either in domestic or in international realms, while making arguments of all sides transparent, also de-politicizes the issues by forcing all parties into the framework of legal arguments. This de-politicization reflects the decline of political pluralism in Russia. What is needed in order revitalize Russia’s civil society and transform its political governance, is a thorough rethinking of the notion of national security that includes NGOs participating in transnational advocacy networks as partners in providing it.


Name: Reja Younis
Section: International Relations and American Foreign Policy
Professional Email: rejayounis1@gmail.com
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: The University of Chicago
Scheduling Preference: Saturday Afternoon
Proposal Type: Paper
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Paper Title:  Refugee Narrative in the United States: Presidential Securitization and the Role of Distance
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This paper is concerned with whether geographical distance between a refugee group’s country of origin and host country (i.e. the United States) influences the translation of Presidential rhetoric into a media-based narrative. Through a qualitative analysis of newspapers and speeches from three Presidential administrations, I find that the treatment of refugees as an existential threat via speech act by the President (“securitized” rhetoric) results in a securitized narrative when refugees are from geographically distant countries relative to the United States. Treatment of refugees with compassion (“humanized” rhetoric) by a President equally leads to a securitizing narrative turn when refugees are from far away. In contrast, securitization fails and humanization triumphs when refugees are from geographically proximate countries. Fear eclipses compassion when refugees come from countries that are far removed from the United States.



Political Theory


Identity Politics


Public Policy and Public Administration

Name: Wil Pinkney
Section: Public Policy & Public Administration
Professional Email: wil.pinkneyjr@gmail.com
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: CUNY Grad Center
Scheduling Preference: No Preference
Proposal Type: Paper
Panel Title: N/A
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Paper Title:  Test
Abstract:
The is a test abstract.



State and Local Politics


Teaching and Learning

Name: Anita Chadha
Section: Undergraduate Research
Professional Email: chadhaa@uhd.edu
Professional Status: Associate Professor
Institution: university of houston, downtown
Scheduling Preference: Friday Morning
Proposal Type: Paper
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Panel Description: Teaching and learning in the digital age
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Paper Title:  Academic deliberation in an international collaboration: nuances among students in the U.S. and Korea.
Abstract:
With the growth of online courses, academic researchers have been evaluating the academic viability of these online offerings. Past research on a cross-country online collaboration among students from Texas, New York and California find that students discuss current and controversial issues in American politics with “academic/reflectivity” in their discussions with each other. “Academic reflectivity” was computed as a compound variable measuring deliberative, reflective posts and responses, using class or text references, posing questions that furthered academic discussions and the length of the post suggesting thorough discussions. For this presentation, one semester of data from fall 2018 will be analyzed across international boundaries that between a class in Houston, TX in the U.S. and a class offered at a university in Korea. It is anticipated that their discussions will be academically reflective, and that they will be tolerant and respectful of each other in online spaces. This study will be among the first about the significant impact of online discussions promoting and enhancing the experience of e-learners and collaborative endeavors internationally.



Undergraduate Research


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