Abstract Review

American Politics

Name: Gentiana Çileposhi
Section: American Politics
Professional Email: gentiana.memia@hotmail.com
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: Ana2011
Scheduling Preference: Saturday Morning
Proposal Type: Paper
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Paper Title:  Is USA a political power or economic power country
Abstract:
Tema: Is USA a political power or a economic power country . What is economic power? It is the power to produce and to trade what one has produced. In a free economy, where no man or group of men can use physical coercion against anyone, economic power can be achieved only by voluntary means: by the voluntary choice and agreement of all those who participate in the process of production and trade. In a free market, all prices, wages, and profits are determined—not by the arbitrary whim of the rich or of the poor, not by anyone’s “greed” or by anyone’s need—but by the law of supply and demand. The mechanism of a free market reflects and sums up all the economic choices and decisions made by all the participants. Men trade their goods or services by mutual consent to mutual advantage, according to their own independent, uncoerced judgment. A man can grow rich only if he is able to offer better values—better products or services, at a lower price—than others are able to offer. Now let me define the difference between economic power and political power: economic power is exercised by means of a positive, by offering men a reward, an incentive, a payment, a value; political power is exercised by means of a negative, by the threat of punishment, injury, imprisonment, destruction. The businessman’s tool is values; the bureaucrat’s tool is fear. But nearly 400 years ago, the English philosopher Thomas Hobbes wrote that peace and security among the people were impossible without a government to enforce them. In his new book A Case for Goliath: How America Acts as a World Government in the 21st Century, Michael Mandelbaum, a political analyst at Johns Hopkins University, writes that after the Cold War, the United States played an important role in maintaining world order. This offers guarantees. Their military presence suppresses suspicions in Europe and Asia that would otherwise be felt and could lead to unintended political turmoil. The United States is leading the fight to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons to dangerous regimes or groups. " According to Professor Madelbaum, America also offers these services in the international economy.America's role, he says, brings benefits because it provides products to the public even without controlling the politics or economics of other societies. So why do so many people in the United States and around the world criticize this kind-hearted Goliath? Political interests, particular policy disputes and cultural differences are some of the reasons Mr Mandelbaum offers. But some analysts disagree.Benjamin Barber, a professor at the University of Maryland, says the United States often acts more as a dominant power than a government.“American hegemony brings some benefits to people. It can bring police control and security, cash for aid and banks, etc. And, normally, a rich country can do things that poor countries can't do. But they do so to the detriment of freedom, autonomy, justice and even the participation of people to govern their future, which is the true meaning of democracy. "Professor Barber says regime changes from the United States to Iraq and Afghanistan are examples of America imposing its will on other countries. What the world needs, says Mr Barber, is a multinational governing body to tackle global issues such as energy supply, pollution, natural disasters, epidemics and conflicts. Meanwhile, emerging regional powers such as China and the European Union are trying to have more international influence. But so far, neither has the economic strength, political will or military power to reach an international consensus to take the lead in the world community. So if the United States were to reduce its role in international relations, most analysts warn that the world could become more dangerous and less prosperous.



Comparative Politics


History and Politics


International Relations and American Foreign Policy

Name: Mohammad Haque
Section: International Relations and American Foreign Policy
Professional Email: mohammad.haque@uconn.edu
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: University of Connecticut
Scheduling Preference: Friday Morning
Proposal Type: Paper
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Paper Title:  Masquerades of Security Assistance: Security Measures and Beyond
Abstract:
Although security assistance has become a key part of building security measures based on the states’ perceived security threats from external, trans-national and internal actors, its delivery has erupted a major debate and controversy based on its purpose and usage. Some argue that security assistance mechanism helps the recipient countries to defend security threats and sustain internal stability, and benefits the donor countries to protect their partners and allies across the globe. Others maintain that security assistance deteriorates internal stability and increases sufferings to the mass population in the recipient nations. Following human rights perspectives, the current study explores how and why the security assistance delivery mechanism is masquerading its actual purpose and roles while intending to develop security measures. Findings indicate that this mechanism benefits the minority - donors and the governments of recipient countries - while disregarding mass people’s rights especially gender equality, children’s and indigenous people’s rights. Thus, in the name of developing security measures, it is actually hampering the overall development process in the recipient nations.


Name: Daniel Weisz Argomedo
Section: International Relations and American Foreign Policy
Professional Email: dweiszar@uci.edu
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: University of California Irvine
Scheduling Preference: No Preference
Proposal Type: Paper
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Paper Title:  Hactivism: Redefining What Activists Can Do
Abstract:
The importance of this project is to show that hacktivism has redefined the boundaries of what activists can do as well as the theoretical preconceptions of what is necessary to cause meaningful change and the creation of powerful social movements. The first chapter presents a literature review on social movement theory, that provides the theoretical context for the questions I explore in subsequent chapters. The following chapters are divided into three main research questions. Chapter Two addresses the first question: How does the non-territorial domain of cyberspace create new opportunities for activism? I argue that the Internet represents a unique location in which hacktivists engage each other and have bearing on the physical world and on the Internet itself. The research question I pose in Chapter Three is: How is power manifest differently in hacktivism compared to other forms of social movement strategy? This question follows the premise that social movements require large numbers of individuals to exercise greater impact. Hacktivists integrate individuals who are not technically adept at hacking into their activities. However, a single technically adept individual could cause as much if not more impact than a large group of individuals. The final research question I explore in Chapter Four is the following: Does hacktivism possess any distinct advantages over other forms of social movement protest, and if so, what are they? I show that the answer to this question has to do with the flexibility of hacktivism, which allows activists to use it effectively, on a global scale, against practically any target.



Political Theory


Identity Politics

Name: Cyril Ghosh
Section: Identity Politics
Professional Email: cyril.ghosh@wagner.edu
Professional Status:
Institution: Wagner College
Scheduling Preference: No Preference
Proposal Type: Paper
Panel Title:  Test
Panel Description: Test
Co-author info: Test
Co-presenter info: Test
Paper Title:  Test
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Public Policy and Public Administration


State and Local Politics


Teaching and Learning


Undergraduate Research


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