Abstract Review

American Politics

Name: Michael Armato
Section: American Politics
Professional Email: marmato@albright.edu
Professional Status: Assistant Professor
Institution: Albright College
Scheduling Preference:
Proposal Type: Paper
Panel Title: TEST
Panel Description: TEST
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Paper Title:  TEST
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TEST



Comparative Politics


History and Politics

Name: Yaela Collins
Section: History and Politics
Professional Email: yaelacollins@gmail.com
Professional Status: Graduate Student
Institution: New York University
Scheduling Preference: No Preference
Proposal Type: Paper
Panel Title: The European Defense Action Plan: Is Collective Defense Worth Implementing  
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Paper Title:  Ethnic Prejudice in Dutch Counterterrorism
Abstract:
Europe’s focus on the formation of an economic union, though prosperous, has created a fragmented and arguably incompatible security framework. Reluctance to surrender political and military sovereignty has left the region largely weakened and extremely vulnerable to both homegrown and rising external threats. Resulting gaps in border regulations, defense capabilities, and intelligence-sharing are being studied and exploited by terrorists and other adversaries keen on elevating their chances of carrying out a successful attack. The EU’s “security situation” has been in deteriorating for far too long and increases in “intensity, frequency, and complexity” of conflicts and problems in Europe are working to highlight the fissures in existing policy and procedure. Further, high public threat perceptions and the continuously evolving nature of threats are accumulating to pose unprecedented risks to EU stability. In the wake of blatant inefficiencies in organization, spending, and action, the question arises; “would money allocated to individual EU member defense budgets be better spent on collective EU defense?”



International Relations and American Foreign Policy

Name: Michael Busch
Section: International Relations and American Foreign Policy
Professional Email: mbusch@ccny.cuny.edu
Professional Status: Adjunct Professor
Institution: The City College of New York
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Co-author info: Garri Rivkin
Co-presenter info: Garri Rivkin
Paper Title:  States of Exception: Transnistria and Sovereign Recognition
Abstract:
This paper examines the phenomena of de facto states that are refused sovereign recognition from the United Nations and its member states. It focuses on the case of Transnistria, a tiny sliver of territory sandwiched between Moldova and Ukraine. Transnistria constitutes one of a small number of territories in world politics that features its own governing institutions, a standing military, a national currency and monopoly control of force in its territory, but which has been denied what Stephen Krasner calls international legal sovereignty, even by its closest allies. Why? Drawing on the international relations and comparative politics literatures examining questions of sovereignty and critical geopolitics, as well as research from the field, this paper argues that despite the postcolonial order of nation-states organized into regimes of global governance characterizing contemporary world affairs, patterns of imperial power politics still govern, to a large degree, outcomes in the world's peripheral territories. This is especially true of Transnistria which continues to linger in the limbo of tensions between Russian and Western interests. The paper helps fill a surprisingly substantial gap in the international relations literature on the politics of sovereign recognition of de facto states since the Cold War, and textures our understanding of the nature of sovereignty in theory and practice.


Name: Shelby Davis
Section: International Relations and American Foreign Policy
Professional Email: se9davi@siena.edu
Professional Status: Undergraduate Student
Institution: Siena College
Scheduling Preference: No Preference
Proposal Type: Paper
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Co-author info: Dr. Leonard Cutler Siena College cutler@siena.edu
Co-presenter info: Dr. Leonard Cutler cutler@siena.eduSiena College
Paper Title: An Emergent Trump Doctrine: A Preliminary Examination 
Abstract:
This paper is intended to provide a preliminary examination of President Donald Trump and his administration’s counterterrorism policies, as well as an examination of whether or not a Trump doctrine has emerged so far. The paper focuses on counterterrorism policies regarding the Middle East, specifically Yemen, Afghanistan, Syria, and Iraq, and the threats that lie within. President Trump has increased the role of the military as well as has implemented the policy of “flexible authority,” which provides the military with speedier decision-making. This allows the military to proceed with airstrikes, raids, bombing missions, arming allied forces, etc., in a more timely fashion without waiting for senior officers’ approval. This research is crucial in today’s world, as terrorism is one of the top threats endangering the United States. It is important for the United States to create and fully implement a thorough strategy regarding how to deal with these threats, and this paper looks to find whether or not such a thorough strategy exists. The paper derives its information from government documents, such as the Authorization for the Use of Military Force, politically centered news sources, such as Politico, as well as major think tanks, such as the Cato Institute. This paper is unique in that it will be updated throughout the course of President Trump’s term to follow his actions, whether or not a strategy progresses, and if any counterterrorism goals are achieved. For example, there has been considerable speculation that the President will soon take a stand against Iran concerning the previous nuclear agreement between the country and former President Barack Obama, as President Trump feels as though Iran has violated the terms and conditions of the agreement. Any changes in areas such as this regarding the regions discussed will be researched and updated in the future and added to this paper. This paper will contribute knowledge and awareness of what is to come in regards to protecting our nation from terrorist threats.



Political Theory

Name: chrysoula gitsoulis
Section: Political Theory
Professional Email: cgitsoulis@gradcenter.cuny.edu
Professional Status: Adjunct Professor
Institution: ccny/cuny
Scheduling Preference: No Preference
Proposal Type: Paper
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Paper Title:  utilitarian vs rights-based ethics: degrees of separation
Abstract:
The most glaring weakness of utilitarianism, according to many of its critics, is that it fails to respect individual rights. As a consequentialist moral theory, it holds that it is the consequences or ends of our actions (maximizing happiness) that determine whether particular means to them are justified. But this appears to entail that it’s ok, e.g., to poison your grandfather so you can donate his fortune to charity, or kill a healthy patient so you can use his organs for life-saving transplants, etc. My paper will be devoted to addressing this objection. I will try to show that it is best to think of the difference between utilitarianism and rights-based ethics not as a difference in kind, with no common ground, but as a difference in degree. Once we see that the difference between these theories is a matter of degree, it will become apparent that the rights-based theorist faces a similar type of objection, and hence is no better off than the utilitarian in terms of the stated objection. I will also discuss some of the advantages this strategy has over rule-utilitarianism in dealing with the stated objection.


Name: Spiros Makris
Section: Political Theory
Professional Email: smakris@uom.gr
Professional Status: Assistant Professor
Institution: University of Macedonia, Thessaloniki, Greece
Scheduling Preference: Friday Morning
Proposal Type: Paper
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Paper Title:  Republic as demos. The post-foundational ontology of Cornelius Castoriadis
Abstract:
The contemporary Greek political and social philosopher Cornelius Castoriadis has formulated a post-foundational ontology of democracy in which ancient Greek demos dominates. In contrast with the political theories of modernity, where the epicenter of politics is the power of the state, Castoriadis advances a republican approach of politics, in which power is just a social imaginary without stable foundations. This post-foundational political and social ontology of imaginery brings to the fore both the creative and catastrophic powers of radical human imaginery. Demos is the locus classicus of a republic in the meaning of a public space, where the performance of politics is contingent, open and, to a great degree, unpredictable. This means that democracy would not be taken for granted. In doing so, Cornelius Castoriadis builds an agonistic approach of democracy, where demos is not the power of the state, but a fragile and constantly changed public sphere, where politics is the metonymy of human creativity and freedom. The ontological aspects of this democratic theory give Castoriadis's approach a philosophical and poetical dimension. Either Hesiod's chaos or Aeschylus's anthropology or Sofocle's self-creation of man reveal, according to Castoriadis, human tragedy in the ancient Greek meaning of the word, i.e. the titanic and chaotic the same time capabilities of humanity. Demos is the ontological and political scene of this human tragedy. So, democracy as a republic is not only about common good and public happiness. It concerns human openness towards evil. This the paradox of democracy. For Castoriadis, in a Freudian psychoanalytic way, citizens must always fight for the sake of democracy, having in mind that radical human imaginery is by definition the other ontological face of mythical Abyss.



Identity Politics

Name: Binneh Minteh
Section: Identity Politics
Professional Email: bminteh@scarletmail.rutgers.edu
Professional Status: Adjunct Professor
Institution: Rutgers University
Scheduling Preference: Saturday Morning
Proposal Type: Paper
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Paper Title:  Pattern of Police Shooting of Unarmed African –American men: Impact on Police Community Relations in The United States (US)
Abstract:
Increased deadly police violence against unarmed young black males has left us with so many unanswered questions. On July 5, 2016, Alton Sterling, a 37-year-old black man, was shot several times at close range while held down on the ground by two white Baton Rouge Police Department officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. On July 6, 2016, a Falcon Heights, outside Minneapolis Minnesota police officer shot and killed Philando Castile, a 32- year old black Motorist. On August 13, 2016, Smith, 23, was killed in Wisconsin after what Milwaukee police said was a brief foot chase when he ran from a traffic stop. In September, 2016, 40-year-old Terence Crutcher was shot and killed by Officer Betty Shelby on a Tulsa, Oklahoma road with his hands in the air. Similarly, 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott was fatally shot and killed police in Charlotte, North Carolina sparking days of protest. This paper distinctively argues that policing in all the three cases are rooted in institutionalized racially biased practices entrenched in stereotyping and targeted policing activities, excessive force and the inability of officers to use discretion. Using a comparative case analysis, the paper draws on literature of policing and violence, grievances, opportunities to provide policy recommendations.



Public Policy and Public Administration

Name: Gina Keel
Section: Public Policy & Public Administration
Professional Email: keelgl@oneonta.edu
Professional Status: Associate Professor
Institution: SUNY Oneonta
Scheduling Preference: Saturday Morning
Proposal Type: Paper
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Paper Title:  Politics of GMO labeling post-preemption
Abstract:
TBD, this is a test.


Name: Peter Mameli
Section: Public Policy & Public Administration
Professional Email: pmameli@jjay.cuny.edu
Professional Status: Associate Professor
Institution: John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Scheduling Preference: No Preference
Proposal Type: Paper
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Paper Title:  Managing the 2017 Ebola Outbreak in Democratic Republic of the Congo
Abstract:
In May of 2017 word began to spread across international media that an outbreak of Ebola had surfaced in the Central African country of Democratic Republic of the Congo. The news was both sobering and worrisome for a people that had weathered prior bouts with the illness. The worst transnational Ebola epidemic in history had only recently concluded approximately a year earlier in West Africa, with over 11,000 officially killed. That two year long episode primarily impacted the countries of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Less directly affected were the states of Mali, Nigeria and Senegal, as well as select Western European countries and the United States who each saw a smattering of scattered cases. It was the first time the region of West Africa had ever experienced Ebola. Among the issues that stood out in the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic was the inability to quickly control the spread of the virus through multi-level and multi-actor management techniques. In fact, the early stages of the crisis were widely criticized for slow and ineffective response across a variety of sectors of the global political system. As a result of the West Africa epidemic the situation in Democratic Republic of the Congo becomes of greater interest than it might otherwise have been to both academics and practitioners. With a newly elected Director-General of the World Health Organization entering office, the successful or unsuccessful engagement of the Democratic Republic of the Congo outbreak offers clues as to whether or not lessons gleaned from earlier Ebola episodes have been properly absorbed and put into practice. In this paper I will explore the following questions: 1) How does the management of the Ebola epidemic in Democratic Republic of the Congo compare with others in its history? 2) How does the management of the Ebola epidemic in Democratic Republic of the Congo compare with the 2014-2016 outbreak in West Africa? 3) What are the possible reasons behind successes or failures in responding to this latest Ebola occurrence?


Name: Andrew Pattison
Section: Public Policy & Public Administration
Professional Email: apattison@colgate.edu
Professional Status: Assistant Professor
Institution: Colgate University
Scheduling Preference: Friday Afternoon
Proposal Type: Paper
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Paper Title:  The Weight of Carbon on Policy: Towards a Framework for Understanding How Greenhouse Gas Inventories Can Inform Equitable Climate Policy Design
Abstract:
Using top-down carbon emissions inventory data built from direct measures, previous analysis has demonstrated socioeconomic variables including household income are related to county-level carbon emissions in complicated ways. While consumption-based emissions have been shown to be positively associated with income, production-based e missions offer a different pattern – one suggesting an environmental inequality story of the “displacement of emissions”. Examinations of “bottom-up” local-level carbon emissions inventory data built from carbon footprint analysis have yielded some similar, but also some more complicated findings. These inventories can help track the displaced emissions back to the affluent communities responsible. We have also shown that consumption-based and production-based emissions are necessary but countervailing conditions for climate policy support at the county level. In this study we attempt to untangle the relationship between socioeconomic data such as household income, different categories of carbon emissions such as production and consumption emissions, and the relationship of these variables to the formulation of climate policy. The primary goal is to test how top-down and bottom-up carbon emission inventory data and environmental foot-printing techniques might inform climate policy design in different ways.



State and Local Politics


Teaching and Learning

Name: Anita chadha
Section: Teaching and Learning
Professional Email: chadhaa@uhd.edu
Professional Status: Associate Professor
Institution: university of houston, downtown
Scheduling Preference: Saturday Morning
Proposal Type: Paper
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My proposal examines an online collaboration based on asynchronous exchanges among peers across three U.S. states and three different time zones as an evaluation of online innovation that produces reflective discussions with academic vigor and provides meaningful suggestions towards the ever-demanding need to design effective online communities and redefine meaningful success for students. Past research has shown that in an online environment asynchronous exchanges among peers were open, frank, expansive, curious, and even confessional in their willingness to share and discuss sensitive issues and are known to boost academic progression (Merryfield, 2001b). These forms of online deliberations are a constructive means by which to collaborate and engage student discussions (Chen, Wang Hung, 2009). In fact, students are given the time, space and ownership of discussions, it sharpens their perspective (Anderson, 2003). A mixed methods approach will be used, first by content analysis and then by statistically testing the analysis. Findings reveal statistical significance in that students employ reflective academic discussions when posting and responding to the instructor and their peers. Given my five+ years of experience with a collaborative online classroom across these states, my study provides meaningful suggestions towards the ever-demanding need to design effective online communities and redefine meaningful success for participants. Unknown to each participant were the gender, race, ethnicity and course level and these unknowns are important towards building an inclusive online classroom with the effort to provide equitable opportunities for participants. This study can be adopted by any field across the humanities, social sciences math or engineering globally.


Name: Anita chadha
Section: Teaching and Learning
Professional Email: chadhaa@uhd.edu
Professional Status: Associate Professor
Institution: university of houston, downtown
Scheduling Preference: Friday Morning
Proposal Type: Paper
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Panel Description: Teaching and learning in the digital age
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Paper Title:  Online deliberations across 4yr public, private and community colleges
Abstract:
This paper adds to the growing body of research concerning the use of varied forms of technology that educators may use to further their wide-ranging educational goals in an ever-changing e-classroom that is open to everyone. Research here evaluates the usefulness of online aids as a means to further deliberative student participation in a collaborative website project structured around discussions in politics. Are the participants civically energized in their discussions with each other? Are they creating dialogue and being reflective irrespective of institution type (4yr public, private and community colleges)? This project’s outcomes have important implications towards understanding the effectiveness of open online learning communities globally. This research is useful in showcasing how one integrates technology into the curriculum and the use of collaborative learning techniques through the web service, http://americanpoliticscollspring17.ning.com/ used in this research. Collaborative approaches are useful for not only preparing new professionals for academic but university administrators and IT professionals making administrative decisions about online teaching.



Undergraduate Research

Name: Katherine Slye
Section: Undergraduate Research
Professional Email: kslye@albany.edu
Professional Status: Undergraduate Student
Institution: SUNY Albany
Scheduling Preference:
Proposal Type: Paper
Panel Title: N/A
Panel Description:
Co-author info: none just me
Co-presenter info: no one just me
Paper Title:  This is a test of the UG submissions
Abstract:
This is where the abstract information will be when UGs submit one



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